Winter Recess

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The six of us will be celebrating holidays, recharging our batteries, and coming up with more posts to share with this incredible community of teachers and writers for the next two weeks. In the meantime, we have lots to keep you going over winter break.

Awaken the Writer Inside of You

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I first heard of the “Heart Map” in 2003 from Nancie Atwell at Walloon Institute in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. I remember thinking it was genius. Then a year later I read the book,… Continue reading

A letter to my departing student teacher

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Six weeks have passed by in flash, it seems, for it is already time to bid my student teacher goodbye. As I compile book list recommendations, photograph charts and student work, and gather… Continue reading

Grammar Matters + a Book Giveaway

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Lynne Dorfman and Diane Dougherty’s new book, Grammar Matters, is for teachers of Kindergarten through 6th grade. It provides lessons as well as grammar references so you can enhance your instruction and get your students excited about learning grammar.

WRITE, SHARE, GIVE: IT’S SOL TIME!

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WRITE a slice of life story on your own blog. SHARE a link to your post in the comments section. GIVE comments to at least three other SOLS bloggers. Several Slicers are heading… Continue reading

Writing Mentors

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All writers need mentors. Who are yours?

The Antidote to December Stress: Teach Students to Write about Gratitude

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This time of year can be overwhelming, for teachers and students alike. Writing about gratitude is one way to stay present and positive.

Throwback Week: I Do. We Do. You Do.

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This week, we’ve been re-posting our favorite old posts. I always learn a ton from my friend and co-blogger Stacey Shubitz. This post of hers, from one year ago, is one that I just loved.

Throwback Week: Student Self-Assessment: Introducing the Writing Checklist

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Back in October, Tara introduced us to her checklist process with students. What I love about this post is that Tara doesn’t have students use a checklist merely for the purpose of checking… Continue reading

THROWBACK WEEK: HOW DO YOU PULL AWAY? LET GO OF THEIR HAND

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Nurturing independence in writing workshop is one of the hardest things to do,  and one of the tasks I struggle with the most.  Betsy’s post from last May, “How you pull away? Let go of… Continue reading

Throwback Week: How To Read A Unit of Study

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Learn some tricks for reading the Units of Study, whether you’re new to the units or have been using them for many years.

WRITE, SHARE, GIVE: IT’S SOL TIME!

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WRITE a slice of life story on your own blog. SHARE a link to your post in the comments section. GIVE comments to at least three other SOLS bloggers. “Writing is the only… Continue reading

Throwback Week: Information Writing – Upping the Ante on Text Features

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In almost every classroom I have coached in, kids get really excited about adding text features to their informational writing. They love adding pictures, labels, maps, and table of contents to their writing.  But… Continue reading

Throwback Week: A Peek Inside Dana’s Writer’s Notebook

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    This week on Two Writing Teachers, we each chose another co-author’s previously published post to feature as part of our very own Throwback Week. I am kicking it off, with a great… Continue reading

Demonstration Texts, Part Deux

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Thinking about your demonstration texts this way can give you some inspiration for multiple ways to teach the same minilesson, to the whole class, or to small groups as follow-up.

Where Do the Words Go?

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When students first begin writing their stories they are oral and planned drawings. Eventually, however, letters and words begin to emerge on the page. How do we instruct this change? It first begins with… Continue reading

Workshop Routines: Sometimes It’s Time For The Reset Button

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Sixth graders have short-term memories.  Just when I’d thought  that I’d nailed down efficient routines, and I was sure that my writing workshop was going to run smoothly for the rest of the… Continue reading

Four Types of Demonstration Texts

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The way I felt about starting my first garden is probably how a lot of kids feel during writing workshop when we give mysterious directions to “add more detail” or “grab the reader’s interest.” The language many of us use during writing workshop probably makes perfect sense to adults–but for kids we need to be more explicit. Teaching just by telling is not enough.

WRITE, SHARE, GIVE: IT’S SOL TIME!

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WRITE a slice of life story on your own blog. SHARE a link to your post in the comments section. GIVE comments to at least three other SOLS bloggers. I am so grateful… Continue reading

Conferring Roles

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What is the teacher’s role in a conference? What is the student’s role?