How Do First Graders Choose Narrow Topics?

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We will be starting a unit on informational writing to wrap up the school year. I wanted to demonstrate a different way of finding a topic, a narrow topic. I find that young… Continue reading

Five on Friday: Picture Books Edition

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Find out which five, NEW picture books I’m fawning over this Friday.

Nonfiction Book Clubs: A Snippet of an IRA Workshop

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Today’s post is based on a workshop presented at the International Reading Association conference titled: Thinking, Talking, and Writing about Nonfiction Reading. Nonfiction Book Clubs provide the perfect opportunity for students to solidify all they are learning and to get better at writing about their reading.

Time for the Tuesday Slice of Life Story Challenge!

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Join us for the Tuesday Slice of Life Story Challenge!

A Quick Little Conference About Choices

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I pulled a child-sized chair over to Zach and sat down next to him. “How’s it going?” I asked. “Not good,” was his reply. “What seems to be the trouble?” Zach explained that… Continue reading

ICYMI: The TWT Independent Writing Blog Series

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In case you missed it…all of last week we’ve been running a blog series devoted to fostering independent writing across grade levels, across the school year, and even during the summer!  Here’s what… Continue reading

Independent Writng: Multi-genre writing projects to celebrate a year of writing workshop

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    The last quarter of the school year brings gifts all its own – it’s a time to celebrate all the investment that has been made during the first three quarters: our… Continue reading

Independent Writing: 10 Ways to Get Students Published in the Real World

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Some students want to write more than what is required of them in writing workshop. Enter independent writing projects! But how do you go from being another set of eyes on some additional writing a student does to helping him/her go public with their work?

Independent Writing: Back-Up Work

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Encouraging students to have back-up work honors who they are as writers.

Summer Writing Projects in the Upper Grades

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Channeling students to write over the summer can generate loads of independence and engagement. Read on for tips on how to get started.

How Do You Pull Away? Let Go of Their Hand

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Letting go can be hard. Here are some thoughts on how to engage and disengage from the writer during the process of building independence.

Tuesday Slice of Life Story Challenge

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Welcome to the Slice of Life Story Challenge. Here are few quotes for inspiration. Enjoy! When I write, my mind’s not filled with visual imagery.  It’s filled with language.  Words.  I seek words,… Continue reading

Independent Writing Blog Series Starts Now!

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Today launches our Independent Writing Blog Series! Join us all week long as we write about writing projects, summer writing, getting published in the real world, multi-genre projects, pulling back to let kids write on their own, and much, much more! Also join us for a Twitter chat on Monday, May 12 at 8:30pm EST with the hashtag #TWTBlog.

In my writing workshop: it’s finally time for photographs and digital stories.

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At last August’s Summer Institute, Cornelius Minor, teacher extraordinaire and staff developer at TC’s Writing and Reading Project, gave an unforgettable presentation on technology in the classroom which I wrote about on my… Continue reading

Words Come Alive

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How do you make words come alive? In third grade we talked about description and details making our words visible to the reader.

Five on Friday

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Five things I’m reading, enjoying, and thinking about this Friday.

First Graders Get Crafty

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First graders use a mentor text to get crafty during a unit on informational writing.

How Are You Living Your OLW?

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How are you living your One Little Word?

It’s SOL Time

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“Start writing, no matter what. The water does not flow until the faucet is turned on.”
― Louis L’Amour

The Meaning of Maggie Book Review + Win a Copy of a Fabulous Read

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Soon-to-be-released The Meaning of Maggie by Megan Jean Sovern is a lovely book that offers plenty of opportunities to study high-level character development.