Lessons from Characters Who Are Writers: Discovering the Writer’s Life

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Kids often feel as though that they are the only ones who have ever been stuck for ideas, or been laughed at, or had a story rejected (by a teacher, or friend). No matter where you live, no matter what you write, there is no need to discover every writing problem all on your own. That’s where characters in books come in. Why not learn from them?

Using Artifacts and Photos to Inspire Writing: Discovering the Writer’s Life

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Using artifacts and photos from our life allows us to reconnect with stories and breathes in new life to our writer’s notebooks.

So, Why Do I Write? Discovering the Writer’s Life

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When the co-authors of Two Writing Teachers invited me to join the team, I was overwhelmed. When Julie Johnson asked me to co-author an iBook through the Columbus Area Writing Project, I was again submerged in fear. I found myself wondering if these writers had read my writing. I mean, if they had read my ramblings on my personal blog they wouldn’t be inviting me, right?
Do writers ever lose their doubts?

STORIES FROM OUR WORLD: DISCOVERING THE WRITER’S LIFE

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We spend so much of our writing workshop time focused on craft moves, and how to make our writing engaging and beautiful; but I want my kids to know that the writer’s life is also about paying attention to the world…

Notebooks on Field Trips: Discovering the Writer’s Life

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One of my favorite things about being a classroom teacher was taking educational field trips with my students. One year, I took my fifth grades on 20-25 field trips around the five boroughs… Continue reading

Breathing Life Back into Notebooks: Discovering the Writer’s Life

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In the middle of the school year, how can we breathe new life and energy into writer’s notebooks?

SOL Tuesday & Four Weeks Until the March Challenge Begins

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In February, there are always new people testing the Slicing waters as March draws nearer. They’re trying to determine whether or not they feel comfortable writing publicly. If you see someone who leaves a comment that says something like, “This is my first slice,” today or Tuesday, please head over to their blog to leave them a comment sicne it’s both exciting and intimidating to put your words out in the world.

Keeping a Class List of Writing Ideas: Discovering the Writer’s Life Blog Series

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One way to show students how to live a writer’s life

Discovering the Writer’s Life Blog Series

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How do you encourage your students to live a writerly life? Check out this week’s blog series.

Writing Tweet Roundup

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Check out Deb’s end-of-the-month curated collection of writing Tweets!

Last Call for the Welcome Wagon!

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Will you help us welcome new Slicers this March?

The Schedule: How Do You Fit It All In?

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In this post, I share several examples of daily schedules, along with links to other resources.

Story: Still the Heart of Literacy Learning

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Take a little tour with me as I share highlights from this new book by Katie Egan Cunningham.

Starting with Story

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I recently had the pleasure of attending the 25th Annual Comprehensive Literacy and Reading Recovery Conference in Illinois.  One of the sessions I attended was led by the brilliant and endearing Christopher Lehman.  His session centered… Continue reading

Join the Fourth Annual Classroom Slice of Life Story Challenge!

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This March marks the fourth year of the classroom version of the Slice of Life Story Challenge, or Classroom SOLSC. We hope that many of you will join the challenge with your classes!

SOLS

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Today is Tuesday which means it is time to write your Slice, share your link, and give at least three comments to other bloggers.  Don’t forget to click on some unfamiliar names in the… Continue reading

Join Our Writing Community!

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Calling all educators! Whether you’re thinking about joining our writing community or coming back for your ninth March writing challenge, please take a few minutes to read this post. (NOTE: There’s a change about who can participate in the individual challenge this year.)

Should Educators Be Writers?

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Is it important that teachers who teach writing actually write?

Dialogue in First Grade

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See how these first graders added dialogue to their narrative writing.

Student Writing Reflection

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Young learners are fascinating. One minute they’re focused and willing workers, seconds later they’re playful and silly, but watch them with their parents and they become entirely different little people, and I am reminded of how young they are. It’s for this exact reason I love working with our youngest learners. Their playful, innocent nature alongside the desire to be a “big kid” suits our job perfectly.